Hickety Pickety Bumble Bee

February 17, 2014 on 3:59 am | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Music/Songs, Phonological Awareness, Practices, Singing, Storytime Component | No Comments

“Hickety Pickety Bumble Bee”

Hickety Pickety bumble bee
Who can say their name for me?
First child’s name.
Clap it. (Clap out the syllables in the child’s name.)
Whisper it. (Whisper the syllables.)
No sound. (Mouth the syllables.)
Hickety pickety bumblebee,
Who can say their name for me?

Early Literacy Aside–Example–Phonological Awareness
By clapping out and singing children’s names, they hear words slowed down and they hear the parts of words, the syllables. This will later help them as they try to sound out words when they learn to read.
The kids love the song, and parents tell me that they are clapping out the syllables to other family members names too.

Submitted by Marie Rogers, Hardin County Public Library in KY

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Sing by Joe Raposo

January 7, 2014 on 12:46 am | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Books, Example Aside, Explain Aside, Music/Songs, Phonological Awareness, Practices, Singing, Storytime Component | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Explain: Some of us can sing well, others not so well. Some of us like to sing whether we can or not and others would rather not sing. Did you know that singing is one way to help children learn the sounds in language which will then help them hear sounds as they learn to sound out words? Songs have a distinct note for each syllable so children hear the rhythm of language and hear words broken down into parts.

Early Literacy Aside–Example: Our next book is a songbook. It uses the words to the song as the book itself. It’s called Sing by Joe Raposo. I often feel like the third bird! I hope you do too. Let’s see what happens when one of the three birds can’t sing. We can all sing the words together and notice how songs help with hearing sounds in words.

Read/sing the book first describing what is happening in the wordless pictures.

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Little You by Richard Van Camp

January 6, 2014 on 11:48 pm | In 0 to 2, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Content, Example Aside, Explain Aside, Practices, Reading, Storytime Component, Vocabulary | No Comments

Using a baby doll or stuffed animal as a baby, demonstrate reading this book using more words than what is in the text. For example page 1: Little you, little wonder. Point to the parents and to the child. Here is the father and the mother and there is the little baby. There is a big round red sun in this picture (as you point to it) and a little flower with a ladybug. They look happy together, they are smiling. Another example, page 3: Little wish, gentle thunder. Let’s see what is in this picture; there’s a cat and a little kitten, a baby cat, just as this mother is holding her baby. And look out the window, there is a crescent moon. It looks dark outside. We see a flash of lightning that also comes with thunder. When I was little I used to be afraid of storms, especially when the thunder was so loud.
Early Literacy Aside–Explain: In today’s storytime I’ll be pointing out different ways you can read with your baby. Reading with your children is the single best thing you can do to help them become good readers later. There are many ways to read and share books with young children and I’ll be pointing out some today.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: When you read to your baby and the book has only a few words on the page, take time to add your own words about the picture or about things the picture makes you think about. This adds to your baby’s vocabulary and background knowledge which will make it easier for them to later understand what they read.

You can have a few minutes of Read Together time where you pass out board books for each family and have them add words to the few in the book. They may not get through the whole book. That’s fine! They are enriching their babies’ language experience.

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Cow Loves Cookies by Karma Wilson Handout

April 23, 2013 on 8:57 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Storytime Component, Storytime Handouts, Uncategorized | No Comments

Read the book The Cow Loves Cookies by Karma Wilson. Have participants join in with the repeated phrase “but the cow loves cookies.”
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: At the end of storytime pass out the attached handout. Tell the adults they can cut out the pictures with their children and play different games.  Children can match the animals to what they eat. Use the pictures to help children retell the story, too! Young children can say the sounds of the animals. Have children say the repeated phrase “but the cow loves cookies.” Older children can retell the story using the pictures to remember the order. All these are steps to help your children retell stories and help them understand how stories work which will later make it easier for them to understand what they are reading.
Handout: cowlovescookies

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Little Red Hen Handout

April 15, 2013 on 6:48 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Empower Aside, Practices, Storytime Component, Storytime Handouts, Talking | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Empower: In our storytime today, we read the story of the Little Red Hen by Byron Barton. Your children also retold the story with me on the flannel board. In today’s handout I have the repeated phrases and the order of what the little red hen did. There are also boxes for your children to draw the animals. You can cut them out and have the children retell the story for you. For your younger children, they can say the words “Not I” or say the sounds of the animals. Having your children retell stories helps them understand the story better and helps them learn how stories work. Enjoy!
Handout: lrhenhandout

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Rock a Bye Baby

April 15, 2013 on 6:14 pm | In 0 to 2, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Example Aside, Music/Songs, Phonological Awareness, Practices, Singing, Storytime Component | No Comments

Song as lead in to book: Rock a Bye Baby
[Adults rock baby back and forth]
Rock a bye baby on the tree top,
When the wind blows, the cradle will rock.
When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
And I’m there to catch you, cradle and all.

Early Literacy Aside–Example: When we sing to babies, they hear language slowed down which makes it easier for them to hear the sounds in words. Even thugh we may not sing to our children for this purpose, it is the beginning of helping them to later sound out words when they later learn to read.

Jane Klein, Chester County (PA) Library System

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Too Much Noise by Ann McGovern

March 15, 2013 on 9:04 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Crafts/Activities, Storytime Component, Storytime Handouts | No Comments

Empower Aside: I have a handout for you related to the book we did with a flannel board today in storytime, Too Much Noise. Using little cues like the flannel board pieces can help your children retell the story. The handout has squares where your children can draw in the animals, you can cut them out and then retell the story together. Your youngest children can say the animal sounds, slightly older children can say the names of the animals and perhaps repeat the words “too noisy” and your preschoolers can try retelling the whole story. All of these are stages in helping your children develop narrative skills which will help them later understand what they read and how stories work. Enjoy!
Handout for Too Much Noise:  multsttoomuchnoise

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Song in Spanish

September 27, 2012 on 9:17 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Example Aside, Music/Songs, Practices, Singing, Spanish-English, Storytime Component, Talking | No Comments

Here is a song that is fun to sing in English, Spanish or both, to the tune of “Frere Jacques.”
Esta canción es divertida cantar en inglés, español, o ambos, al tuno de “Frere Jacques.”

Hello children.                  Hola niños.
How are you?                   ¿Como están?
Very well thank you.        Muy bien gracias.
How about you?               ¿Y Usted?

Although today we are having  fun singing songs in two languages, talk with your children in the language  that is most comfortable for you. It is best for children to know one language  spoken fluently. If children know one language well, they can learn another one  more easily. If you are fluent in more than one language you can choose which  language to talk with your child in.

Aunque hoy  nos divertimos por cantar en dos idiomas, recuerde hablar con sus niños en el  idioma que usted mejor sepa.  Es mejor para  los niños saber un idioma con fluidez.  Si los niños saben bien un idioma, es más fácil para ellos aprender  otro.  Si usted habla con fluidez más que
un idioma, puede elegir en cual quisiera hablar con su niño.

by Katie Cunningham, http://bilingualchildrensprogramming.blogspot.com

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Library Love Song

September 27, 2012 on 7:30 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Print Motivation, Example Aside, Music/Songs, Storytime Component | No Comments

Library Love Song
[Storytime presenter]
I love you, you love me
We’re a happy library
With a great big hug
And a wish from me to you
Won’t you say you’ll read books, too!

[Child to adult/parent]
I love you, you love me
Won’t you share a book with me?
With a great big hug
And a wish from me to you
Won’t you say we’ll read books, too!

Early Literacy Aside–Example: Keeping that close connection as we read with children is something they cherish. It is this kind of feeling around reading books that helps them see reading as something enjoyable. This attitude helps them want to hear more books, read more and makes learning to read easier.

Jane Boss, Hennepin (MN) Public Library and Diana Price, Bucks County (PA) Free Library

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Tree Poster

September 27, 2012 on 7:10 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Explain Aside, Print Concepts / Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

This poster is available in English and Spanish through the Library of Virginia: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/el
It is downloadable and has print specs if you want to get it printed by a printer in poster format. I print off a picture of an apple blossom and tape it to the branch of the early literacy skill I am highlighting that day.
Early Literacy Aside–Explain: Our early literacy tip today is on print awareness, helping children understand that print has meaning. Today in storytime I’ll be pointing out ways we can support this pre-reading skill as you read and play with your children.

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