Joseph Had an Overcoat by Simms Taback

April 22, 2013 on 4:41 pm | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Empower Aside, Flannel Board, Storytime Component, Storytime Handouts | No Comments

Read book:  Joseph Had an Overcoat by Simms Taback
Have children say the repeated phrase, “But it got old and worn.”
Retell with flannel board: Now let’s do the story on the flannel board. What happened first?
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: [As you give out the handout] I have a handout for you today for Joseph Had an Overcoat. It is the same pattern that I used for the flannel board. You can cut out the pieces and have your children retell the story. As you have your children retell other stories too, using props can help them remember what comes next. For your younger children who may not be able to retell stories, they can repeat a word or perhaps a phrase. These are all activities that will later help your child understand how stories work and also help them understand what they read.
Pattern for flannel board and handout:  josephovercoathandout

 

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Something from Nothing by Phoebe Gilman

August 8, 2012 on 9:18 pm | In 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Empower Aside, Flannel Board, Storytime Component, Storytime Handouts | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Empower: Earlier in our storytime we read the book Something from Nothing and then you helped tell the story with the flannelboard. Today I have a handout for you, so that you can color and cut out the pieces from the rectangular blanket and then retell the story at home. Adults, when you give your children little aids or props, it helps them remember the story and retell it. When children retell stories they are better understanding how stories work as well as the story itself. This will help them later understand what they read. Have fun together!
Handout:  handsomnothpattskill
Library Staff: You can enlarge the handout to make your own flannelboard.

Submitted by Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant www.earlylit.net

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Baby’s Bath with flannel board

June 11, 2012 on 7:34 pm | In 0 to 2, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Phonological Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

This rhyme, I’ll do with the flannel board. First I’ll say the rhyme, and put up the figures. Then we’ll all say the rhyme together.
Baby’s ready for a bath.
Here’s the baby’s tub.
Here’s the baby’s washcloth.
Rub a dub a dub.
Here’s the baby’s cake of soap,
And here’s the towel to dry,
And here’s the baby’s cradle,
Rock-a-baby-bye.

Early Literacy Aside–Example: As we say rhymes with our young children they hear both the rhythm of language and the rhymes. Being exposed to rhymes helps them hear the smaller sounds in words, a first step in later learning to read.

by Amy Alapati and Virginia Krute, Montgomery County (MD) Public Library, based on version in Ring a Ring o’ Roses, 9th ed. Flint Public Library, Permission granted Flint Public Library, Flint, MI

babybathFB

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Fill a Tub with Water flannel board

June 11, 2012 on 7:34 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, Adult Aside, Empower Aside, Flannel Board, Storytime Component, Vocabulary | No Comments

Introduction to flannel board: Let’s see what happens when you fill the tub with water. What might we see in the bathtub? Each line starts with “Fill the tub with water, what do you see?” Let’s say that together.  . . . Good!

Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see bubbles floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a washcloth floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a cake of soap floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a shampoo bottle floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a little boat floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a pouring cup floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a toy shark floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see some swim goggles floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a watering can floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see?  I see a rubber ducky floating in the bathtub sea.
Fill the tub with water, what do you see? I see a nice clean baby splashing in the bathtub sea.

Early Literacy Aside–Empower: Even when you are giving your children a bath, naming the objects, describing them, talking about floating and sinking, heavy and light, as they play with toys in the bath; these are good ways to expand their knowledge and vocabulary which will later help them understand what they read.

by Amy Alapati and Virginia Krute, Montgomery County (MD) Public Library
Flannel board pattern:  filltubwaterFB

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Freight Train with flannel board

June 11, 2012 on 6:59 pm | In 2's and 3's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Letter Knowledge, Storytime Component | No Comments

Preparation: Use the attached pattern to cut out large flannel board pieces. You can make the pictures smaller to cut out pieces that you will hand out to the storytime participants.
Activity: We have just read the book Freight Train by Donald Crews. Now let’s play a matching game on the flannel board. Here is the whole train. [Put up the cars of the train and name them. Describe their color, shape, etc. Pass out one car to each of the storytime participants. Remove your whole train. Put up one car and describe it.] I have put up the cattle car. It is green and looks like a rectangle. It has two lines in the middle that cross each other. They look like an X. Several of you have a green cattle car. If you do, come up and make your match on the flannel board. Good job! [Continue with other cars.]
Early Literacy Aside–Example: When we play matching games with children, we help them notice characteristics of objects, what is similar and different. This type of thinking will later help them notice differences and similarities in letters as they learn to identify letters and learn to read.
freighttrainFB
small cars can be used for individual handout:  http://www.makinglearningfun.com/t.asp?b=m&t=http://www.makinglearningfun.com/Activities/Train/TrainPatterning/TrainPatterning-Cars.gif

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Shapes Flannel Board and Matching Game

April 28, 2010 on 5:43 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Crafts/Activities, Empower Aside, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Letter Knowledge, Storytime Component | No Comments

Preparation for Presenter: Using cutouts of different shapes (see attachment below) make shapes you can use on the flannel board. If you want to play the matching game in addition to talking about shapes, make more than one of each shape.
Introduction: Today we talked about shapes and alike and different. So let’s see what shapes you see up here. Depending on the size, age-level and attention span of the group, you can put the shapes up yourself or hand them out to the toddlers and have them put the shapes up on the flannel board. Say the name of the shape as well as some additional description. For example, ”Here is a circle, a small blue circle.” Have the children repeat the name of the shape and/or the description.]
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Helping your child notice and talk about shapes later helps them identify letters. When you think of an upper case A, there is a triangle shape in it.
For Matching Game:
You keep one copy of each shape and pass out the additional copies of the shapes. Put up one shape, say what it is and describe it. Then have those children who have the same shape come up to the flannel board to add theirs to yours. Don’t forget to clap for each person. Adults are welcome to help their children.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Playing matching games helps your child notice what is alike and different. This is one part of developing letter knowledge.
Matching Game Variation:
You can make the matching more challenging by making patterns on your shapes. For example, you may color a couple of circles on a square, or make a design on two copies of the same shape. You can make the matching more or less challenging by how intricate or obvious the differences are. Use the handout of shapes for parents and children to cut out and play with at home.
Early Literacy Aside for Shape Handout–Empower: This handout has several shapes you can cut out at home. You can use them as patterns and cut them out of different color paper. You can draw on them to make different patterns to match as well. You might ask your toddler to put all the circles together, all the ones with straight lines, all the ones with the same color. Sorting is one way of noticing what is alike and different. When children try to recognize letters they will need this skill. Think of a lower case h and a lower case n. They look similar but they are also different.
Shapes for Flannel Board
Shapes for Parent Handout

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Adult/Child Animal Flannel Board

April 24, 2010 on 1:03 am | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Empower Aside, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Storytime Component, Storytime Handouts, Vocabulary | No Comments

Introduction: Our next activity is with animals and what they are called. Baby animals are often called something different from the adult animal. This activity helps your children learn these words.
[Put up adult and baby animal figures as you say their names, having children repeat them with you. If you like you can pass out the baby animals to each child. You put up the adult animal and the child puts up the matching baby animal as you say the name of it. Have children repeat the words for both adult and baby animals. Encourage adult to help if needed.]
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Saying the words for both the adult and baby animals helps to develop your children’s vocabulary.
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: Today you saw how we can expand children’s vocabulary by giving specific names to things. We did it with animals. You can do the same with the vehicles you see all around you. If your child is calling everything that goes a car, you can say, yes, that’s a car, that’s an SUV, that’s a van, that’s a pick-up truck, and so forth. Even if they can’t say all these words, hearing you say them is how they begin to learn these words. You can also add description, like that shiny yellow car with silver hubcaps. These little things you do throughout the day in enjoyable ways all build your child’s vocabulary which later helps them understand what they read.
Adult Animals
Baby Animals

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Shape Bee

April 17, 2009 on 1:57 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Crafts/Activities, Empower Aside, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Letter Knowledge, Storytime Component | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Example:  Before children learn letters, they learn shapes. Let them play with shapes to develop later letter knowledge.
Flannel Board: Do Shape Bee on flannel board. See attachment for pattern Shape Bee pattern
Craft Activity: You can use the pattern as a basis to have the children make their own Shape Bee.
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: Wherever you go today, look for the letter B, on signs, in books, on products. Then you can do the same with other letters throughout the week.

Submitted by Erin Nguyen, Public Library of Charlotte and Mechlenburg County (NC)

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Way Down Deep in the Deep Blue Sea by Jan Peck

April 17, 2009 on 12:51 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Storytime Component | No Comments

Introduction:  I am going to read our next book, Way Down Deep in the Deep Blue Sea by Jan Peck. Then you can tell it with me on the flannel board.
Read Way Down Deep in the Deep Blue Sea. Repeat some of the rhymes to help them remember.
Flannel Board: As you put up pieces on the flannel board have the children retell the story.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Using the flannel board pieces as a clue will help your child remember the story to retell it. Encouraging your children to retell stories helps them to both remember and to understand them. It is a first step in helping them to later understand what they will read.

Submitted by Stem Saunders, Steele Creek Library, Public Library of Charlotte and Mechlenburg County (NC)

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Old Macdonald Had a Farm Flannel Board

March 10, 2009 on 7:48 am | In 2's and 3's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Crafts/Activities, Empower Aside, Example Aside, Flannel Board, Music/Songs, Phonological Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

Pass out flannel board pieces of fam animals. Play or sing “Old Macdonald Had a Farm” .   When a child hears the animal he/she is holding, that child comes up to place the animal piece on the flannel board.
Early Literacy Aside–Example:  Having your children hear and make the sounds of the animals is one enjoyable way to help them develop phonological awareness, to eventually be able to hear the smaller sounds in words.
Take-Home Activity: Hand out shapes of animals for families to take home.
Early Literacy Aside–Empower:  Parents, you can use these animal shapes to make animal sounds with your children and home and sing the song with them to practice the skill of phonological awareness.

Submitted by Helen Patzer, Dayton (OH) Metro Library, Northtown-Shiloh Branch.

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