You Can Do Anything, Daddy by Michael Rex

June 24, 2008 on 4:33 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Books, Example Aside, Print Concepts / Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

[Notice how the fonts for what the boy says and what the father says are different.]
Read the book You Can Do Anything Daddy by Michael Rex. Point to some of the words that are in large type (gorilla, robot, Mars)
Early Literacy Aside–Example: I pointed to some of the words in the book, the ones with larger type, as I read them. This helps children understand that it is the words we are reading, which develops print awareness, one of the skills children need for later reading.

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Tippy-Toe Chick, Go! by George Shannon

June 24, 2008 on 4:26 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Books, Example Aside, Movement Activities, Phonological Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

Book Introduction: In our next book, there is a mother hen and her three chicks, one is a Big Chick, one the Middle Chick, and lastly the Little Chick. The Little Chick likes to run on tiptoes, very quickly. Everyone stand up. Let me see you run in place, just where you are standing. Great! Now let me see you stand on tiptoe. That’s right you don’t touchyour heel to the floor. Now run in place again, but on tiptoe–that’s how Little Chick runs. Everyone sit down and let’s see what happens. In this book there are sounds like RUFF-RUFF that the dog makes. Let me hear you say that. Great! For Little Chick the sound is tippy-toe, tippy-toe, tippy-toe. Let me hear you say that. Great!
OK, ready?! As I read the book you’ll be making these sounds. Listen to the story too and see how smart Little Chick is.
Read the story Tippie-Toe Chick, Go! by George Shannon.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Having your children make the sounds of animals and other sounds helps them develop phonological awareness, being able to hear the smaller sounds in words. This is so important when they later try to sound out words.

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Tippy-Toe Chick, Go! by George Shannon

June 24, 2008 on 4:16 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Print Motivation, Books, Example Aside, Explain Aside, Storytime Component | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Explain: Letting your children know when you really enjoy a book helps them see your own enjoyment. Even doing this small thing helps develop print motivation, a child’s interest and enjoyment of books and reading.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Our next book is funny and clever. I enjoy this book because the little chick is the one who is so smart! Listen to what happens.
Read the book Tippy-Toe Chick, Go! by George Shannon.
[For more participation, which also supports print motivation, have the participants chime in for RUFF-RUFF and tippy-toe, tippy-toe.]

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Don’t Worry Bear by Greg Foley

June 24, 2008 on 4:09 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Books, Example Aside, Print Concepts / Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

Book Introduction: Our next book is Don’t Worry Bear by Greg Foley. [Run your finger under the title.] In this book the caterpillar says the words “Don’t worry, bear” over and over again. Let’s practice saying that–”Don’t worry. bear.” Good! . . .
As I read the book, I’ll point to you all and you’ll know to say, “Don’t worry, bear.” [As you read the book run your finger under the words don't worry bear, as they say these words.]
Early Literacy Aside–Example: You noticed that I ran my finger under the words don’t worry bear each time you all said those words. This helps develop your children’s print awareness, knowing that print has meaning and that it is the words we read. You can do this with any book you read!

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Don’t Worry Bear by Greg Foley

June 24, 2008 on 3:59 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Content, Books, Example Aside, Storytime Component, Vocabulary | No Comments

Before reading the book, talk about the process of how a caterpillar grows and then goes into a chrysallis or cocoon and then emerges as a butterfly or moth.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Talking about what you know, even if it is not in the book, helps your children understand the world around them. Use words that your child may not already know, just explain them. This is how you build their vocabulary and background knowledge which will later help them understand what they read.
Read the book Don’t Worry Bear by Greg Foley.

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Don’t Worry Bear by Greg Foley

June 24, 2008 on 3:56 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Example Aside, Storytime Component | No Comments

Before reading the book talk about caterpillars and how they grow. Ask questions to see what the children already know.
Read the title, Don’t Worry Bear, and tell the group that these words are repeated throughout the book. Let’s say them all together, “Don’t worry, bear.” The caterpillar keeps saying “Don’t worry, bear,” and you will say it each time. Let’s try it.
Read the book Don’t Worry Bear by Greg Foley.
Early Literacy Aside–Example:
Having the children repeat a phrase in the book is the beginning of developing your children’s narrative skills. The next step is to have your child retell the story to you. This later helps with your child understanding what he will read when he gets to school.

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Buzz, Buzz, Buzz! Went Bumblebee by Colin West

June 18, 2008 on 7:14 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Narrative Skills, Books, Empower Aside, Example Aside, Explain Aside, Fingerplays and Rhymes, Storytime Component | No Comments

 Early Literacy Aside–Explain: Narrative skills can be developed by having your children tell stories. This is easier for some children when they recognize patterns so that they can predict what will happen next.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: As we read the book we want to encourage our children to recognize the pattern and to repeat “buzz, buzz, buzz” and “buzz off.”
Read Buzz, Buzz, Buzz! Went Bumble-bee by Colin West
Fingerplay: Here is the Beehive
Here is the beehive. Where are the bees?  (Hold up fist.)
Hidden away where nobody sees. (Move other hand around fist.)
Watch and you see them come out of the hive. (Bend head close to fist.)
One, two, three, four, five. (Hold fingers up one at a time.)
Bzzzzzzzz all fly away! (Wave fingers.)
Early Literacy Aside–Empower:  Children enjoy repeating phrases as they did in our book and song. Please help your children look for patterns in the books and songs you do at home. This helps foster your children’s narrative skills which will later help them understand how stories work and will help them understand what they read.

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Who’s There on Halloween? by Pamela Beall

June 18, 2008 on 6:51 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Books, Empower Aside, Explain Aside, Music/Songs, Phonological Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Explain: Rhyming is one way that children learn to hear that words are made up of smaller parts. By doing rhymes with them you are supporting phonological awareness. This skill helps them when they later try to sound out words. And it’s fun, too!
Read Who’s There on Halloween? by Pamela Beall

Song: Do a rhyming song to the tune of Are You Sleeping?
We are rhyming; we are rhyming.
Rhyme with me; rhyme with me.
Nose rhymes with toes; nose rhymes with toes. (substitute other words from story)
Rhyme with me; rhyme with me.
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: Take advantage of lots of opportunities to play rhyming games with your children. Simple activities like this will help your child be able to sound out words when they learn to read.

Submitted by participants in Saskatchewan Library Association Conference

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Move Over Rover! by Karen Beaumont

June 18, 2008 on 6:12 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Books, Example Aside, Phonological Awareness, Puppets/Dolls/Props/Dramatics, Storytime Component | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Example:  As we read this book listen for words that rhyme, words that sound similar. Even the title of the book Move Over Rover has two words that rhyme. Hearing and making rhymes will help your children sound out words when they learn to read.
Read Move Over Rover by Karen Beaumont
Repeat the story using stuffed characters and a box or crate as a doghouse and let the children tell the story, using rhyming phrases from the book.
Submitted by participants of Saskatchewan Library Association Conference

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Fidgety Fish by Ruth Galloway

June 18, 2008 on 6:05 am | In 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Books, Example Aside, Explain Aside, Phonological Awareness, Storytime Component | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Explain:  Today we are focusing on phonological awareness, the early literacy skill that includes rhyming and helps children hear parts of words. This activity will help children later sound out words as they learn to read.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: This story, Fidgety Fish by Ruth Galloway, has rhyming and non-rhyming segments. We’ll see words that rhyme and words that don’t. Rhyming breaks words into smaller parts. Words that sound like the sounds they make also support phonological awareness. This is called onomatopoeia.

Submitted by participants of Saskatchewan Library Association Conference

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