Little You by Richard Van Camp

January 6, 2014 on 11:48 pm | In 0 to 2, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Content, Example Aside, Explain Aside, Practices, Reading, Storytime Component, Vocabulary | No Comments

Using a baby doll or stuffed animal as a baby, demonstrate reading this book using more words than what is in the text. For example page 1: Little you, little wonder. Point to the parents and to the child. Here is the father and the mother and there is the little baby. There is a big round red sun in this picture (as you point to it) and a little flower with a ladybug. They look happy together, they are smiling. Another example, page 3: Little wish, gentle thunder. Let’s see what is in this picture; there’s a cat and a little kitten, a baby cat, just as this mother is holding her baby. And look out the window, there is a crescent moon. It looks dark outside. We see a flash of lightning that also comes with thunder. When I was little I used to be afraid of storms, especially when the thunder was so loud.
Early Literacy Aside–Explain: In today’s storytime I’ll be pointing out different ways you can read with your baby. Reading with your children is the single best thing you can do to help them become good readers later. There are many ways to read and share books with young children and I’ll be pointing out some today.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: When you read to your baby and the book has only a few words on the page, take time to add your own words about the picture or about things the picture makes you think about. This adds to your baby’s vocabulary and background knowledge which will make it easier for them to later understand what they read.

You can have a few minutes of Read Together time where you pass out board books for each family and have them add words to the few in the book. They may not get through the whole book. That’s fine! They are enriching their babies’ language experience.

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Song: If You Want to Know an Answer

November 17, 2013 on 3:03 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Content, Background Knowledge--Science, Explain Aside, Music/Songs, Practices, Reading, Storytime Component | No Comments

If You Want to Know an Answer is a good opening song especially when you want to emphasize what we can learn from factual books. You can substitute words to emphasize any aspect of learning.

Song:
If You Want to Know an Answer (tune:  If You’re Happy & You Know It)
If you want to know an answer, read a book!
If you want to know an answer, read a book!
If you’re wondering where the moon goes;
If you’re wondering how the grass grows;
If you want to know an answer, read a book!

If you’d like to learn to draw, read a book!
If you want to learn to draw, read a book!
If you’d like to draw a dog,
Or a frog sitting on a log;
If you’d like to learn to draw, read a book!

If you’d like to learn to bake, read a book!
If you’d like to learn to bake, read a book!
If you’d like to make some candy,
Or a pizza that is dandy;
If you’d like to learn to bake, read a book!

Early Literacy Aside–Explain–Background Knowledge:  Factual books offer many opportunities to add to children’s knowledge based on their interests. Sharing factual books not only helps children learn about the world around them, but also will help them later understand what they read. In today’s storytime, I’ll be pointing out different ways to share factual books and information with children.

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My Face Book by Star Bright Books–bilingual books

June 25, 2012 on 9:00 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, Age Levels, Books, Practices, Reading, Storytime Component, Video Clip | No Comments

Video clip on using bilingual books, example of My Face Book from Star Bright Books
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iCOg3fzr1Q
Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant  www.earlylit.net

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Effective Early Literacy Aside–Video Clip

June 25, 2012 on 8:46 pm | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Explain Aside, Phonological Awareness, Practices, Reading, Singing, Storytime Component, Video Clip, Vocabulary | No Comments

Video clip explanation and demonstration of ineffective and efffective early literacy asides.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvnbeBcdFaI
Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant  www.earlylit.net

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Fire Truck by Peter Sis

April 24, 2010 on 12:47 am | In 0 to 2, 2's and 3's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Books, Empower Aside, Example Aside, Practices, Reading, Storytime Component, Vocabulary | No Comments

Introduction: This book Fire Truck, written and illustrated by Peter Sis, has lots of interesting words in it.
Early Literacy Aside–Example: Listen to the many different words your child is hearing, words we might be using in everyday conversation. Because books have three times as many rare words as we use in conversation, it is important for children to hear the language of books. As I’m reading this book, just hold up a finger when you hear a word you would not be using everyday when talking with your child. Then we’ll see how many you heard at the end of the book.
Read the book.
Ask how many words they heard that they would not use in conversation with their children.
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: As you read books at home with your children, you may notice some words they are not familiar with. You don’t have to explain every unfamiliar word, but you might choose one to point out and explain. Don’t replace unfamiliar words, or they won’t hear them. This is how you help their vocabularies grow!

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Talking while reading

June 12, 2008 on 6:11 am | In 2's and 3's, 4's and 5's, Adult Aside, Age Levels, Background Knowledge--Book/Story--Print Motivation, Books, Empower Aside, Explain Aside, Practices, Reading, Storytime Component, Talking | No Comments

Early Literacy Aside–Explain: Talking with your children while reading, encouraging them to make comments and ask questions is one way to share a book that develops your child’s understanding of the book. Make reading with your child a postive experience by allowing your child to make comments and ask questions. Try to focus all your attention on your child for that time.
During the storytime, demonstrate these techniques with one or more of your books. Point out what you are doing.
Early Literacy Aside–Empower: Talking with your children and giving them time to respond is supervaluable, even in a conversation consisting entirely of baby babble. This helps your children develop conversation skills. Remember that it can take young children from 5 to 12 seconds to process a question and formulate a response, so it’s really important to gie them that extra time to express themselves.

Submitted by Cindy Christin, Bozeman (MT) Public Library and Tracey J., Sacramento (CA) Public Library

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