Old Macdonald using sounds

Early Literacy Aside--Example: Helping children hear the beginning sounds of words is one way to develop their phonological awareness--their ability to hear the smaller sounds in words. This will later help them sound out words when they learn to read. You can put new words to the tune of the song Old Macdonald. I'll say two words and you see if you can hear the beginning sound which is the same for both words. SSSSSad and SSSSSSilly. What's the sound that is the same for both words? Right! /s/ Now we'll sing a song about it. Let's try it. To the tune of Old Macdonald Had a Farm What’s the sound that these words share? Listen to these words: Sad and silly are these words Tell me what you heard. With a /s/, /s/, here and a /s/, /s/ there Here a /s/, there a /s/, everywhere a /s/, /s/ /S/ is the sound that these words share. We can hear the sound!

Try other words and sounds. It is easier for the children to join in with the sounds if you talk about the words before singing the song.

A Tisket a Tasket

Early Literacy Aside--Example: We just read a book with rhyming words and then went back to a page and talked about the rhyming words. In order to emphasize rhyming words, here is a song you can sing after you and your child have talked about two rhyming words. So let's say you have noticed that ball and tall rhyme. Here's the song.This helps develop your child's phonological awareness, being able to hear the smaller sounds in words.A tisket a tasket Let's make a rhyming basket Boy and toy share an ending sound. Rhyming words are all around!

Pop Goes Pre-Reading

Song for Explain Early Literacy Aside:To the tune of Pop Goes the Weasel
Our early literacy skill today
is letter knowledge [fill in the name of the skill].
Getting to know lots of shapes [Substitute aspect of skill being highlighted]
will HELP children read.

Add information related to skill: Researchers have found that children recognize letters according to their shapes.  Talking with young children about shapes is one way to support emerging literacy skills.

Some examples for other skills, to fill in:
Skill=vocabulary: Explaining unfamiliar words . . .
Information on skill: Researchers have found that children who have larger vocabularies, who know more words, can more easily recognize words they sound out and can also more easily understand what they read when whey learn to read.
Skill=print motivation . . . Having fun while sharing books
Information on skill: Researchers have found that children who have enjoyable interactions around books and reading are more likely to stick with learning to read even when it is difficult.
Skill=phonological awareness . . . Clapping out the parts of words . . . OR Having fun with rhyming words . . .
Information on skill: Helping children hear the smaller sounds in words will help them later to sound out words when they begin to read.
Skill=print awareness  . . . Pointing to signs all around . . . OR Pointing to words in a book Information on skill: Understanding that the written word stands for the words helps children understand how reading works.
Skill=background knowledge . . . Reading information books . . . OR Telling your children what you know . . .
Information on skill: Children are naturally curious. By adding to the information they know on topics that interest them, they will later be able to better understand what they read. Skill=background knowledge . . . Having children retell stories . . .
Information on skill: When children retell stories they learn how stories work, that the have a beginning, a middle, and an end. This will help them later when they have to write stories in school.

Choose only one skill to highlight (to say the aside).

Sound in a Bag/Box

Preparation: Put some items in a bag or box, some of which starting with the sound /p/ (for example). Some examples include: pretzel, popcorn, paper, pig. Also include some items for words that do NOT begin with /p/.
Introduction: Ohhhh, here is my sound bag/box. Let’s see what’s in it today. Our llama in the book we just read was wearing red pajamas (Llama, Llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney). Pajama starts with the sound /p/. Let me hear you say /p/. Good! I am going to pull out different things from my sound box. Let’s see which ones have the same beginning sound as pajama, /p/.
Play Game: As you pull items out of the bag, say what it is; or ask the children what it is. Repeat the word and emphasize the first sound. Our next item is a car. Car. Car. Car starts with /k/.  Are /k/ and /p/ the same sound? That’s right! They are not. Let’s look for our next item. What else do I have in here? What is this? Right, a pencil. Pencil. Pencil. Pencil starts with /p/. Do pencil and pajama sound alike at the beginning? Yes, they do!
Early Literacy Aside--Example Aside: Helping your child hear the beginning sounds of words, in a playful way, like with this game, is one way that you can help your child develop [phonological awareness,] hearing the smaller sounds in words.
Early Literacy Aside--Empower Aside: We played the sound in a bag game today. You can play this game with any items you have around the house. Or you can have a sound day--today is /d/ day. Throughout the day you and your children look for or think of words that start with the /d/ sound. Remember, you're not thinking about how a word is spelled, just the beginning sound. Keep it fun, not frustrating. This game is one way to help your children later sound out words when they learn to read.

Hush, A Thai Lullaby by Mingfong Ho

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: Today our early literacy tip is on hearing the smaller sounds in words. This pre-reading skill will help children later sound out words when they learn to read. [The skill is called phonological awareness.] I'll be pointing out some activities you can do to support this skill as you read with your children.
Introduction:Hush: A Thai Lullaby by Mingfong Ho is our next book. It is about a mother in Thailand singing a lullaby to her baby.
Early Literacy Aside--Example: This book has both animal sounds and rhyming words. Both of these activities, hearing and saying animal sounds and hearing and saying rhyming sounds and words support one of the early literacy skills, phonological awareness.
Read the book. Have participants join in with saying the sounds of the animals. After you read the book, come back to a page and talk about two words that rhyme. Have the children think of other words that rhyme--remember they can be nonsense words.
Early Literacy Aside--Empower: Today I pointed out some activities around the early literacy skill phonological awareness: hearing different sounds such as animal sounds, as we just did and having children make those sounds. For older children, we want them to be able to hear the smaller sounds in words, the syllables, to be able to hear and make the beginning sound in a word, to be able to hear and make rhyming words, and to play with these sounds. Researchers know these are important skills for later when your child tries to sound out words. Children develop at different stages and some things will be harder for some and easier for others. It is easier to recognize a rhyme than to make a rhyme, so if your child cannot rhyme a word, say two words and ask if they rhyme. By doing these activities, you will be helping your child enter school ready to learn to read.

Big Chickens Go To Town by Leslie Helakoski

Introduction to book: Our next book is Big Chickens Go to Town by Leslie Helakoski. There are a couple of other Big Chicken books and I think they are very funny. See what you think.
Read the book taking your cue for voice expression from the pictures.
Early Literacy Aside--Example (for Vocabulary):
This book has so many interesting words. Use them all, like "the chickens bawled, squalled and caterwauled." This is how your child's vocabulary will grow. Even if they (or you) don't understand every word, you can get the idea from the story itself. That's one of the wonderful things about books, they have so many interesting words.
Early Literacy Aside--Example (for Phonological Awareness):
This book has many rhyming words. [Demonstrate with one page. For example, reread the page that starts Shouting voices wobbled.] Wobbled rhymes with bobbled. Flumped rhymes with bumped and rushed rhymes with crushed. Let's think of some other words that rhyme with crushed. They don't even have to make sense. (mushed, brushed, zushed) Pointing out and making rhyming words helps to develop one of the early literacy skills called phonological awareness--hearing the smaller sounds in words. This will later help your child sound out words when they learn to read.

Choose only one skill to highlight (to say the aside).

Scarecrow, Scarecrow Rhyme and Dance

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: Here's a rhyme that you can do anytime and it reinforces rhyming words which develops phonological awareness while having fun at the same time.Do Scarecrow, Scarecrow activity Children stand up with arms bent at elbows like a scarecrow and head tilted. Actions to words. Scarecrow, Scarecrow, turn around Scarecrow, Scarecrow, jump up and down Scarecrow, Scarecrow, raise your arms high Scarecrow, Scarecrow, wink one eye Scarecrow, Scarecrow, bend your knees Scarecrow, Scarecrow, flap in the breeze Scarecrow, Scarecrow, climb into bed Scarecrow, Scarecrow, rest your head.

Submitted by Terri Stringer, Vandalia Branch, Dayton Metro (OH) Public Library

Cock-a-Moo-Moo by Juliet Dallas-Conte

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: Hello, parents. Today in storytime we are highlighting one of the early literacy skills, phonological awareness. This is the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words including rhyming, beginning sounds and today we'll be doing animal sounds. Developing this skill will help children later sound out words as they learn to read.As you read Cock-a-Moo-Moo, note when the rooster crows that the font is large which means to use a LOUD voice. Point out the words for the corresponding sounds. Conclude the story by having the children say cock-a-doodle-do loudly to convey the rooster getting it right. Early Literacy Aside--Example: Hearing and learning animal sounds helps children hear the smaller sounds in words too. Early Literacy Aside--Empower: Hearing the rhythm of language and making the sounds of animals, both of these contribute to phonological awareness, hearing the smaller sounds in words, one of the skills that researchers have found helps with reading later on. Take opportunities during the course of the day to point out and to imitate sounds you hear, a car horn, the doorbell ringing, and so forth.

Submitted by Mona Ferguson, Public Library of Charlotte and Mechlenburg County (NC)

Mama Cat Has Three Kittens by Denise Fleming

Cat Puppet: There's a cat in my hat, a cat in my hat, a cat in my hat today (do twice). What does the kitty cat say? [cat puppet says meow]Read Mama Cat Has Three Kittens Early Literacy Aside--Example: When children hear rhymes, rhythms and sounds of animals, it helps them develop phonological awareness, hearing the smaller sounds in words. This is a skill that will help them as they begin to read. Early Literacy Aside--Empower: Keep doing rhymes with things in your children's world. Today we did cat in my hat. You can do ball in the hall or star on my car (give a star sticker).

Submitted by Cathy Cartedge, Public Library of Charlotte and Mechlenburg County (NC)

Train Song by Harriet Ziefert

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: Researchers have found that one of ways you can support later reading is by helping children hear the smaller sounds in words. This skill is called phonological awareness. Today I'll point out some thing you can do to help your childrne develop this skill.Early Literacy Aside--Example: Rhyming is one way that children learn to hear that words are made up of smaller parts. By doing rhymes with your children you are setting the stage for them to sound out words to read. Read Train Song Early Literacy Aside--Empower: Find a book at home which has rhyming words and see if your child can identify words that rhyme. If you don't have a rhyming book, just read a book and then pick a word and think of rhyming words together.

Submitted by Rita Doran, Dayton Metro (OH) Public Library

Old Macdonald Had a Farm Flannel Board

Pass out flannel board pieces of fam animals. Play or sing "Old Macdonald Had a Farm" .   When a child hears the animal he/she is holding, that child comes up to place the animal piece on the flannel board.Early Literacy Aside--Example:  Having your children hear and make the sounds of the animals is one enjoyable way to help them develop phonological awareness, to eventually be able to hear the smaller sounds in words. Take-Home Activity: Hand out shapes of animals for families to take home. Early Literacy Aside--Empower:  Parents, you can use these animal shapes to make animal sounds with your children and home and sing the song with them to practice the skill of phonological awareness.

Submitted by Helen Patzer, Dayton (OH) Metro Library, Northtown-Shiloh Branch.

Fiddle I Fee Song

Sing the song Fiddle I Fee[If you like you can do it as a "clothesline song". Put string or a rope across the room. As each animal is added, hang it on the clothesline (from left ot right as the children see it). This helps them remember the sequence.

Bought me a cat and the cat pleased me, I fed my cat under yonder tree. Cat goes fiddle-i-fee. Bought me a duck and the duck pleased me, I fed my duck under yonder tree. Duck goes quack, quack, Cat goes fiddle-i-fee. Keep adding verses one-by-one: Bought me a dog and the dog pleased me, I fed my dog under yonder tree. Dog goes bow-wow, bow-wow, Horse goes neigh, neigh, Cow goes moo, moo, Pig goes oink, oink, Sheep goes baa, baa, Goose goes hissy, hissy, Duck goes quack, quack, Cat goes fiddle-i-fee. Early Literacy Aside--Example: This song includes some silly animal sounds which is the beginning of making the child aware of the sounds within words.

Submitted by Carol Miller, Dayton (OH) Metro Library System

Tickle Teddy by David Ellwand

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: Rhyming is one way that children learn to hear that words are made up of smaller parts.  By doing rhymes with them you are supporting phonological awareness.  This skill helps them when they later try to sound out words to read. And it's fun too.Read the book. Early Literacy Aside--Example: Even though young children do not understand the meanings of the rhymes, it is important for them to hear them.  By six months babies are already able to recognize the sounds of the languages they hear.  They also are losing those sounds they don't hear even though they were born able to learn to make them. Submitted by Sandy Smith, Muskingum County (OH) Library System

Five Candles

Five CandlesFive candles on a birthday cake Five, and not one more. You may blow one candle out, [make blowing sound and motion] And that leaves four! Four candles on a birthday cake There for all to see. You may blow one candle out, [make blowing sound and motion] And that makes three! Three candles on a birthday cake Standing straight and true. You may blow one candle out, [make blowing sound and motion] And that leaves two! Two candles on a birthday cake Helping us have fun. You may blow one candle out, [make blowing sound and motion] And that leaves one! One candle on a birthday cake We know its task is done. You may blow this candle out, [make blowing sound and motion] And that leaves none! Early Literacy Aside--Example: Rhyming words are an important step in early literacy. They will help your children distinguish words in the same family with the same vowel and ending sounds. This will help your children when they learn to sound out words to read.

 

Mouse Mess by Linnea Riley

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: We are going to have fun playing with sounds today, reading stories with sound words. Playing with sounds helps develop phonological awareness which will help your child learn to hear the smaller sounds in words.Read book emphasizing sound words like crunch and munch. Then I go back to some pages and have the children say the words with me, again emphasizing different sounds. Early Literacy Aside--Example: Hearing and learning sound words like splish-splash is an enjoyable way of learning phonlogical awareness and will help your children later hear smaller sounds in words. Early Literacy Aside--Empower: At home, play with sound words, like splish-splash in the bath, crunch-munch at snack, and exaggerate how you are saying words to practice hearing their parts.

Submitted by Carrie Burrier, Akron-Summit County (OH) Public Library

Ten Little Campers Fingerplay

Fingerplay: Ten Little CampersTen little campers putting up their tent. (Put finger tips of fingers together forming tent roof) Ten little campers close the vents. (Intertwine fingers together to signify closure) Ten little campers make a ring. (Form circle putting tips of fingers together and thumbs together) Ten little campers start to sing. (Cup hands to mouth) Ten little campers around the fire. (Form circle putting tips of fingers together again) Ten little campers dance till they tire. (Put all ten fingers up in the air and dance them around) Ten little campers say good-night. (Wave good-night with both hands) Ten little campers close their tent up tight. (Intertwine fingers together again to signify closure) Early Literacy Aside--Example: Rhymes are fun to sing and say with your child. Because they rhyme, they also help children develop phonological awareness, an important skill for later reading when they try to sound out words.

Submitted by Beth Grai, Independence (MI) Township Library

Any Rhyming Song

Early Literacy Aside--Explain: Rhyming is one of the things that children learn that lets them hear that words are made of smaller parts. By doing rhyming songs and fingerplays with your child, you are supporting phonlogical awareness. It's fun for you and your child and will help them when it comes time for them to sound out words when they learn to read. Submitted by Molly Beedon, Ypsilanti (MI) District Library

Candlewick Press Storytime Plan

Storytime Plan includes these books with suggested activities and relation to the early literacy skills.Arabella Miller's Tiny Caterpiller by Clare Jarrett On the Farm by David Elliott A Visitor for Bear by Bonny Becker Tweedle Dee Dee by Charlotte Voake [Some activities are more for school-age children.] readtousstoryhourkit.pdf

I Ain't Gonna Paint No More by Karen Beaumont

Early Literacy Aside--Example: As I read this story, I am going to pause and have the children fill in the rhyming word. This is something you can easily do with rhyming books. Start off by using rhyming books that your child has read with you before. Helping your children hear rhymes will help them later to sound out words when they learn to read!Read the book: As you read the book, let the children chime in with some of the rhyming words, like head to follow red. After the book activity: Everyone stand up! What's a word that rhymes with head? Children give suggestions. Pick one--bed. OK, take your hand and dip it in red paint on the floor (pretend). Now take your hand and draw a bed. Good! What's a word that rhymes with green? Perhaps the children say bean. OK, dip your foot in some green paint on the floor, and draw a bean. We all laugh together.

Submitted by Katie Ross, Kanawha County (WV) Public Library System

Tippy-Toe Chick, Go! by George Shannon

Book Introduction: In our next book, there is a mother hen and her three chicks, one is a Big Chick, one the Middle Chick, and lastly the Little Chick. The Little Chick likes to run on tiptoes, very quickly. Everyone stand up. Let me see you run in place, just where you are standing. Great! Now let me see you stand on tiptoe. That's right you don't touchyour heel to the floor. Now run in place again, but on tiptoe--that's how Little Chick runs. Everyone sit down and let's see what happens. In this book there are sounds like RUFF-RUFF that the dog makes. Let me hear you say that. Great! For Little Chick the sound is tippy-toe, tippy-toe, tippy-toe. Let me hear you say that. Great!OK, ready?! As I read the book you'll be making these sounds. Listen to the story too and see how smart Little Chick is. Read the story Tippie-Toe Chick, Go! by George Shannon. Early Literacy Aside--Example: Having your children make the sounds of animals and other sounds helps them develop phonological awareness, being able to hear the smaller sounds in words. This is so important when they later try to sound out words.